Source: Fionn: Defense Of Ráth Bládhma by Brian O’Sullivan #Irish #Mythology #TuesdayBookBlog

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Inspiration

Posted: September 26, 2017 in Uncategorized

Source: Inspiration

i wish i was dead

Posted: September 26, 2017 in Uncategorized

Source: i wish i was dead

Source: THE BEST WAY TO GET A BOOK DEAL? WRITE A STORY 19 MILLION PEOPLE WANT TO READ

Source: 31 Ways to Find Inspiration for Your Writing

New YearCelebrating the new year with six wishes for books and publishing

As we start a new year, it’s nice to envision the most perfect version of the future. Things like world peace, the end of poverty, a miracle cure for global warming, and free ice cream and tacos for everyone.

Sure, that’s a fantasy. But in that line, I’d like to share my list of wishes for books and publishing in 2015. The things that would make the publishing world brighter, bookish lives better, and bring smiles to readers’ faces. Here’s what I wish for 2015:

Publishers realize readers are their customers. This knowledge has been creeping into the world of publishing, but there is still a long way to go. Traditionally, publishers sold books to bookstores and bookstores worried about selling books to customers. That needn’t go away, but it’s not enough. Books are bought and sold all kinds of ways these days, and the better publishers get at reaching the ready reader sitting alone with an electronic device, the healthier their businesses will be.

Amazon figures out how to purge irrelevant one-star book reviews. To close 2014, bestselling author Harlan Coben tweeted his “favorite one-star Amazon review,” which reads, “One star: Never received it — don’t think I ordered it.” Clearly, this is not the fault of the writer, nor does it have anything to do with the book itself. Nevertheless, the one star gets factored into Amazon’s overall ranking of the book, bringing its average down. The only good thing about irrelevant single star reviews is the One-Star Book Reviews Tumblr, which compiles some doozies. For Emily Dickinson’s collected poems, “wah wah wah”; for “Sula” by Toni Morrison, “I rated it a one because I found the sex revolting, as I always do. That’s just me.”

No more novels based on literary figures. Books are great. People who write books are great. And nonfiction books about people who write books are great; no matter how you feel about Roland Barthes’ critique of biography-based literary criticism, writers remain strange and interesting creatures. But lately, our book room has been flooded by novels based on real literary figures. What contemporary writer can do justice in fiction to Shirley Jackson? How can a contemporary novel about her compare to the novels she wrote herself?

Fewer books like “51 Shades of Beige.” Every few years some beleaguered book professional notes that we have too many books, as anyone who sees about 100 per week come across her desk eventually concludes. Part of the problem is that we have too many copycat books. Yes, publishers are eager to capitalize on the last big hit by running the trend into the ground, but that’s not a good thing. Did we need more boy wizards after Harry Potter? A fleet of teens fighting to the death after “The Hunger Games”? Noted symbologists (not an actual occupation) springing up all over after “The Da Vinci Code”? And it’s not just publishers; writers hoping to become the next E.L. James have penned other erotic “Fifty Shades of Grey”-adjacent books like “Fifty Shades of Brown,” “Fifty Shades Pinker,” “51 Shades of Maggie” “Fifty Shades of Naughty,” and “Fifty Shades of Lady Mary Grey.” Too much.

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Self-published writers will find better ways to reach readers. More than 450,000books were self-published in 2013. That’s a lot of books, and it’s almost impossible for new self-published authors to raise their profile above the crowd. There may be plenty of discussions around self-published books, but it’s hard to find authoritative takes on the books themselves. Publishers Weekly has created Booklife, which is still in beta, and its format may speak to book professionals more than readers. Maybe new websites will emerge; maybe new groups of writers will form. Maybe something out there just needs a little boost to become the go-to place for self-published books.

E-books will fulfill their interactive promise. When “The Silent History” was first published in 2012, it thrillingly demonstrated how an e-book could be both a well-written novel and fundamentally different from a print book. Delivered episodically, “The Silent History” was meant to be read on a phone, and if the reader passed certain locations, additional mini-stories set in those places would be unlocked. But two years later, look in the iBookstore and there’s nothing like it — the top interactive e-books are cookbooks, basically gorgeous instruction manuals, and illustrated books for kids. Meanwhile, the Atavist continues, as it has since 2011, to deliver longform nonfiction enhanced for tablets with video, photos and sound, but it remains an outlier. May 2015 bring more e-books that are truly transformed.

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Here’s to 2015 being a creative, bountiful, engaging, surprising year for all writers, readers and book lovers. Cheers.

The End

Posted: November 17, 2014 in Uncategorized

The book business as we know it will not be living happily ever after. With sales stagnating, CEO heads rolling, big-name authors playing musical chairs, and Amazon looming as the new boogeyman, publishing might have to look for its future outside the corporate world.

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HarperCollins occupies floors 1 through 22 of a giant steel-and-glass box on 53rd Street. But up on 26, the receptionist for a tiny offshoot of the company sits alone, gatekeeper to a few drab rows of empty cubicles. A glass container on a table holds a mysterious pile of bright-yellow lightbulbs.

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“Welcome to our temporary home,” says 51-year-old publisher Bob Miller, ushering me into a colleague’s more inviting office. Inside, he and his staffers prepare to impart a cheery message: They’re going to fix publishing!

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But first, a horror story. Debbie Stier, Miller’s No. 2 at HarperStudio (as this little imprint is called), has been collecting videos for their blog. “You want to see what happens to books after they go to book heaven?” she asks. On the screen of her MacBook, a giant steel shredder disgorges a ragged mess of paper and cardboard onto a conveyor belt. This is the fate of up to 25 percent of the product churned out by New York’s publishing machine.

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Everyone’s eyes widen, as though watching some viral YouTube gross-out. “It’s like Wall-E,” says marketing director Sarah Burningham. “It’s depressing,” Miller adds. They had sent in a Flip camera with a warehouse worker. “You can see our books go through there,” says Stier. “The Crichton, the Ann Patchett.”

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Miller recently left Hyperion, which he founded seventeen years ago, to start his own imprint at the urging of HarperCollins’s then-CEO, Jane Friedman. She was replaced in June, but HarperStudio lives on. For all its ambitions, it’s a modest outfit: Miller and three women, two of them in their twenties, hope to publish two books a month starting next May, having convinced 25 authors to forgo big advances in return for half of their books’ eventual profit. The books they’ll be doing aren’t particularly outré—Emeril Lagasse on grilling, 50 Cent is collaborating with The 48 Laws of Power author Robert Greene—but they’re hoping that their process will be revolutionary.

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Over the past few weeks, Stier has turned her own Flip camera on friends and colleagues, asking them to hold up those yellow lightbulbs and share their “bright ideas” on publishing. She plays us a few of the clips, including one of a publicist who delivers Stier’s intended punch line, tentatively: “Have fewer authors and sell more books?” But the suggestion that gets the biggest laugh in the office is from Stier’s 12-year-old son, who says, “So maybe you have to turn all the books into movies so nobody has to waste their time.”

“It is a very trying time. I’m kind of down about it myself.” —JONATHAN GALASSI, PRESIDENT OF FARRAR, STRAUS AND GIROUX

The demise of publishing has been predicted since the days of Gutenberg. But for most of the past century—through wars and depressions—the business of books has jogged along at a steady pace. It’s one of the main (some would say only) advantages of working in a “mature” industry: no unsustainable highs, no devastating lows. A stoic calm, peppered with a bit of gallows humor, prevailed in the industry.

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Survey New York’s oldest culture industry this season, however, and you won’t find many stoics. What you will find are prophets of doom, Cassandras in blazers and black dresses arguing at elegant lunches over What Is to Be Done. Even best-selling publishers and agents fresh from seven-figure deals worry about what’s coming next. Two, five years from now—who knows? Life moves fast in the waning era of print; publishing doesn’t.

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So what’s causing this, exactly—this inchoate dread that’s suddenly turned “choate,” as one insider puts it? The anxiety would be endurable if it was just a function of the late-Bush economy: Sales at the five big publishers were up 0.5 percent in the first half of this year, bookstore sales tanked in June, and a full-year decline is expected. But pretty much every aspect of the business seems to be in turmoil. There’s the floundering of the few remaining semi-independent midsize publishers; the ouster of two powerful CEOs—one who inspired editors and one who at least let them be; the desperate race to evolve into e-book producers; the dire state of Borders, the only real competitor to Barnes & Noble; the feeling that outrageous money is being wasted on mediocre books; and Amazon .com, which many publishers look upon as a power-hungry monster bent on cornering the whole business.

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One by one, these would be difficult problems to solve. But as a series of interrelated challenges, they constitute a full-blown crisis—a climate change as unpredictable as it is inevitable. And like global warming, it elicits reactions ranging from denial to Darwinian survivalism to determined stabs at warding off disaster—attempts not to recapture some long-lost era but to harness new, untapped sources of power. That is, if it’s not too late.

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We must re- think our use of paper completely in the next 10 years. Books are a part of it and the market has spoken first on them. The wastage of forests for print advertising is much more horrific in my opinion, but consumers don’t pay for it directly, so we can’t vote against it with our dollars.
Shredding books that don’t sell hurts my heart. We should only be printing on demand, and no book should ever again go out of print and become hard to find. Existing overstock of print books should be given to charity rather than shredded. Let them serve their purpose before they are recycled, let them have a chance to be read.(unless no-one wants them)
New books must be designed to last a very long time before being completely recycled, or only a year or two before going in the compost. The customer chooses what the book is printed on. A bookstore or newsstand owner could carry compostable copies of literally anything they wanted for impulse purchase, supply would never exceed demand by very much and you could compost the remains. 
Permanent/recyclable books could be beautiful, with full color illustrations, hand calligraphed text, even illuminations. Comparable to current “coffee table” books.
( What a venue for the graphic novel btw…The comic is compostable only, the graphic novel only permanent/recyclable?)
Paper for books doesn’t have to be made of trees. People will only buy books over ebooks for convenience or to collect them. Serve those markets and some of you publishers might survive. Change or die. 

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I don’t have too much sympathy for the Big Publishers in NYC, especially after they pooped on my literary manuscripts, which had chapters published in respectable university literary reviews such as Owen Wister Review, 580 Split, Foliate Oak, Yemassee, and Wisconsin Review. I even was on the fence with a story at Esquire, but the Big Guy trumped the Literary Editor. I’ve turned to Kindle and Book Nook and am maintaining my ownership of my own writing while making a tidy profit.

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Here’s a little real talk about the book publishing industry — it adds almost no value, it is going to be wiped off the face of the earth soon, and writers and readers will be better off for it.

The fundamental uselessness of book publishers is why I thought it was dumb of the Department of Justice to even bother prosecuting them for their flagrantly illegal cartel behavior a couple of years back, and it’s why I’m deaf to the argument that Amazon’s ongoing efforts to crush Hachette are evidence of a public policy problem that needs remedy. Franklin Foer’s recent efforts to label Amazon a monopolist by are unconvincing, and Paul Krugman’s narrower argument that they have some form of monopsony power in the book industry is equally wrongheaded.

What is indisputably true is that Amazon is on track to destroy the businesses of incumbent book publishers. But the many authors and intellectuals who’ve been convinced that their interests — or the interests of literary culture writ large — are identical with those of the publishers are simply mistake.

Books are published by giant conglomerates

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Wisdom on this subject begins with the observation that the book publishing industry is not a cuddly craft affair. It’s dominated by a Big Four of publishers, who are themselves subsidiaries of much larger conglomerates. Simon & Schuster is owned by CBS, HarperCollins is owned by NewsCorp, Penguin and RandomHouse are jointly owned by Pearson and Bertelsmann, and Hachette is part of an enormous French company called Lagadère.

These are not tiny, helpless enterprises. Were their owners interested in the future of books and publishing, they could invest the money necessary to make their own e-reading apps and e-book store and render Amazon entirely superfluous. But the managers of these conglomerates don’t really care. If they can get famous authors to lobby the government to stop Amazon from killing them for free, then they’re happy to take the free labor.

But they don’t want to invest actual money and energy in competing with Amazon, they’d rather wring whatever remaining profit there is out of book publishing and dedicate the money to dividends or other industries they’re also involved in.

Amazon faces lots of competition

It is undeniably true that Amazon has a very large share of the market for e-books. What is not true is that Amazon faces a lack of competition in the digital book market. Barnes & Noble — a company that knows something about books — sells e-books, and does so in partnership with a small outfit called Microsoft. Apple sells e-books and so does Google.

These are not obscure companies. It is not inconvenient for customers to access their products. And since these are companies that are actually much bigger and more profitable than Amazon, there is absolutely no way Jeff Bezos can drive them out of business with predatory pricing.

Amazon’s e-book product is much more popular than its rivals because Amazon got there first, and the competition has not succeeded in producing anything better. But consumers who prefer to buy a digital book from a non-Amazon outlet have several easy options available, and thus a book publisher who chooses to eschew Amazon will not actually be unable to reach customers.

Publishers are superfluous

In the traditional book purchasing paradigm, when a reader bought a book at the store there were two separate layers of middlemen taking a cut of the cash before money reached the author: a retailer and a publisher. The publisher, in this paradigm, was doing very real work as part of the value-chain. A typed and printed book manuscript looks nothing like a book. Transforming the manuscript into a book and then arranging for it to be shipped in appropriate quantities to physical stores around the country is a non-trivial task. What’s more, neither bookstore owners nor authors have any expertise in this field.

Digital publishing is not like that. Transforming a writer’s words into a readable e-book product can be done with a combination of software and a minimal amount of training. Book publishers do not have any substantial expertise in software development, but Amazon and its key competitors (Apple, Google, and the B&N/Microsoft partnership) do.

Publishers would like writers to believe that the pressure they are feeling from Amazon will trickle down and hurt authors as well. But there is a big difference. Even in the brave new world of e-publishing, authors are still making a crucial contribution to the industry by writing the books. Publishers are getting squeezed out because they don’t contribute anything of value.

Book publishers are terrible at marketing

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When I was a kid, my father was a novelist as were both of my grandparents. So I heard a lot of stories about how useless publishers are at marketing books. Then I got to know other people who wrote books and they had the same complaints. Then I wrote a book, and their complaints became my complaints. But it’s easy to whine that other people aren’t marketing your product effectively. It took the Amazon/Hachette dispute to conclusively prove that the whiners are correct.

After all, imagine a world in which publisherswere good at marketing books. Then it would be almost trivial for Hachette to get what it wants out of Amazon. It could just not sell its books on Amazon! Unlike in the old days when it might have been inconvenient for someone who lived in a town with a Borders but no Barnes & Noble to go get a book that Borders didn’t sell, it’s trivially easy to click on some non-Amazon website to order a book. But you do need a customer who actually wants to buy the book.

In his column, Krugman compares Amazon’s large market share to Standard Oil’s. But books aren’t undifferentiated commodities the way oil is. If you want to buy Paul Krugman’s new book, then you can’t just substitute some other book. Hachette, however, seems (appropriately) to have almost no confidence in its own ability to market books.

The real risk for publishers is that major authors might discover that they do have the ability to market books. When George RR Martin’s next iteration of the Game of Thrones series is released, I will buy it. If I can buy it as an Amazon Kindle book, I will buy it that way. If he decides that the only way people should be able to read the book is to get Powell’s to mail them a copy, then I will buy it that way. And I am not alone. Nor is Martin the only author with the clout to not worry about the terms of distribution.

But for a publisher to team up with a celebrity author in this way to bypass Amazon would merely reveal how easy it would be for a celebrity author to bypass the incumbent publishers. In the old days, even the most famous author would need a publishing partner to actually make the physical books. Today that’s not the case. Martin needs a software platform to sell books, but publishers don’t have one. He could easily hire one or more editors to work with him on the copy if he wants to.

Advances aren’t charitable contributions

The final role of the modern book publisher is as a payer of advances. The way the money end of books work is that the person who wrote a book gets paid a royalty on each copy sold — a sum that is generally much less than half the retail price of the book, and dramatically lower than the 70% that Amazon is willing to pay to authors who bypass the publishing incumbents. In addition to royalties, a publisher will typically pay you an advance. The advance is a special kind of loan. When your book first starts selling copies, the royalties you would be owed are kept by the publisher to repay the advance. If you sell a lot of books, you’ll fully repay your advance and start seeing money. If you sell very few books, you’ll never repay your advance and are under no obligation to do so.

To Foer, ultimately, the case against Amazon comes down to advances, which he sees as “the economic pillar on which quality books rest, the great bulwark against dilettantism.” At the same time, he believes that “no bank or investor in its right mind would extend that kind of credit to an author, save perhaps Stephen King.” Thus “it won’t take much for this anomalous ecosystem to collapse” if publishers are pushed too hard by Amazon.

My best guess is that this is too pessimistic about the financial logic behind giving advances. It is not, after all, just a loan that you may or may not pay back. An advance is bundled with a royalty agreement in which a majority of the sales revenue is allocated to someone other than the author of the book. In its role as venture capitalist, the publisher is effectively issuing what’s called convertible debt in corporate finance circles — a risky loan that becomes an ownership stake in the project if it succeeds.

But what really matters here is that book publishers are not charities. They are for-profit business enterprises. If advances don’t make financial sense, then they will die off regardless of what happens to Amazon. If they do make financial sense, then they will live on as financial products even as the rest of the industry restructures.
A bounty of affordable reading

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When all is said and done, the argument between Amazon and book publishers is over the rather banal question of price. Amazon’s view is that since “printing” an extra copy of an e-book is really cheap, e-books should be really cheap. Publishers’ view is that since “printing” an extra copy of an e-book is really cheap, e-books should offer enormous profit margins to book publishers. If you care about reading or ideas or literature, the choice between these visions is not a difficult one. The publishing incumbents have managed to get some intellectuals sufficiently tangled-up to believe that it is. But ask yourself this — do you regret the invention of the printing press? Of the paperback? Do you think public libraries devalue books and reading? The idea is absurd.

Of course a world where more people can get more books more conveniently is a better world. It is true that some individual authors may earn less in the new era, while others authors may earn more. But there is no reason to believe that authors as a whole will get less money. Indeed, as Amazon and other digital distributors gobble up some of the publishers’ slice of the revenue, it’s likely that authors will also get a share and see their total income rise. Beyond money, no book worth writing is undertaken for purely pecuniary motives. In the new regime it will be easier for writers to find readers and reach larger audiences. They just won’t find them through the exact same set of middlemen who currently sit astride the pipeline. Tough on them.

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“Purity and simplicity are the two wings with which man soars above the earth and all temporary nature.” —Thomas Kempis

Simplicity brings balance, freedom, and joy. When we begin to live simply and experience these benefits, we begin to ask the next question, “Where else in my life can i remove distraction and simply focus on the essential?”

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Based on our personal journey, our conversations, and our observations, here is a list of the 10 most important things to simplify in your life today to begin living a more balanced, joyful lifestyle:

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1. Your Possessions – Too many material possessions complicate our lives to a greater degree than we ever give them credit. They drain our bank account, our energy, and our attention. They keep us from the ones we love and from living a life based on our values. If you will invest the time to remove nonessential possessions from your life, you will never regret it. For more inspiration, considerSimplify: 7 Guiding Principles to Help Anyone Declutter Their Home and Life.

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2. Your Time Commitments – Most of us have filled our days full from beginning to end with time commitments: work, home, kid’s activities, community events, religious endeavors, hobbies… the list goes on. When possible, release yourself from the time commitments that are not in line with your greatest values.

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3. Your Goals – Reduce the number of goals you are intentionally striving for in your life to one or two. By reducing the number of goals that you are striving to accomplish, you will improve your focus and your success rate. Make a list of the things that you want to accomplish in your life and choose the two most important. When you finish one, add another from your list.

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4. Your Negative Thoughts – Most negative emotions are completely useless. Resentment, bitterness, hate, and jealousy have never improved the quality of life for a single human being. Take responsibility for your mind. Forgive past hurts and replace negative thoughts with positive ones.

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5. Your Debt – If debt is holding you captive, reduce it. Start today. Do what you’ve got to do to get out from under its weight. Find the help that you need. Sacrifice luxury today to enjoy freedom tomorrow.

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6. Your Words – Use fewer words. Keep your speech plain and honest. Mean what you say. Avoid gossip.

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7. Your Artificial Ingredients – Avoid trans fats, refined grain (white bread), high-fructose corn syrup, and too much sodium. Minimizing these ingredients will improve your energy level in the short-term and your health in the long-term. Also, as much as possible, reduce your consumption of over-the-counter medicine – allow your body to heal itself naturally as opposed to building a dependency on substances.

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8. Your Screen Time – Focusing your attention on television, movies, video games, and technology affects your life more than you think. Media rearranges your values. It begins to dominate your life. And it has a profound impact on your attitude and outlook. Unfortunately, when you live in that world on a consistent basis, you don’t even notice how it is impacting you. The only way to fully appreciate its influence in your life is to turn them off.

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9. Your Connections to the World –Relationships with others are good, but constant streams of distraction are bad. Learn when to power off the blackberry, log off Facebook, or not read a text. Focus on the important, not the urgent. A steady flow of distractions from other people may make us feel important, needed, or wanted, but feeling important and accomplishing importance are completely different things.

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10. Your Multi-Tasking – Research indicates that multi-tasking increases stress and lowers productivity. while single-tasking is becoming a lost art, learn it. Handle one task at a time. Do it well. And when it is complete, move to the next.

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MURDER

Posted: November 9, 2014 in Uncategorized

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Murder me 
Murder with your love 
Murder me with you lies 
You commit murder when I look in your eyes 
You tell me over and over you love me why can’t we just live our lives 
Murder commits suicide 
Kill or be killed 
No choice but to murder 
Love is murder in the making 
When you tell a person you love them its murder in the 3rd degree with a guilty plea 
25 years to life with no college degrees No chance you’ll ever be paroled 
Murder 
Murder Me

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Murder me 
Murder with your love 
murder me with you lies
You commit murder when I look in your eyes 
You tell me over and over you love me 
why can’t we just live our lives 
Murder commits suicide
Kill or be killed
No choice but to murder
Love is murder in the making 
When you tell a person you love them 
its murder in the 3rd degree 
Rip me open from the inside
Until everything falls apart 
The hurt just won’t go away
Until it’s everything I fear 
You are everything I hate
Put me under your spell
Until I can’t escape

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some murder because of love 
some murder because it’s important 
some murder because their nature 

pity the victim for what they don’t get 
pity the murderer for what they should live with

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Murdered By Their Tongues

Threatened by a mentalness, 
That spreading gossip did. 
And murdered by their tongues. 

Whatever between them did exist, 
That ruined their happiness… 
And long loving relationships, 
Has been murdered by their tongues. 

Murdered by their tongues, 
Abandoned good deeds are left undone. 
In big numbers. 

Murdered by their tongues, 
Some people had to run… 
To find their comfort. 

Murdered by their tongues, 
Some choose to begin to run… 
To find their comfort, 
And unencumbered by the numbers. 

They’ve been murdered by their tongues. 
Stubborn these people, 
Who’ve been murdered by their tongues. 
Unconscious people, 
Who are murdered by their tongues. 
These fools are equal, 
Who will murder anyone with their wicked tongues. 

Murdered by their tongues, 
Some people had to run… 
To find their comfort. 

Threatened by a mentalness, 
That spreading gossip did. 
And murdered by their tongues. 

Whatever between them did exist, 
That ruined their happiness… 
And long loving relationships, 
Has been murdered by their tongues. 

They’ve been murdered by their tongues. 
Stubborn these people, 
Who’ve been murdered by their tongues. 
Unconscious people, 
Who are murdered by their tongues. 
These fools are equal, 
Who will murder anyone with their wicked tongues. 

Murdered by their tongues, 
Some choose to begin to run… 
To find their comfort, 
And unencumbered by the numbers

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When you take away a life 

With the aid of a knife 

It is murder 

While you extinguish the living with a gun 
Without being able to recreate what was born 

It is murder 

If you feed someone dead tablets 
Later have second acrimonious regrets 

It is murder 

You are taking away a life 
It is clinging on to survive 
Need I say anymore further 
It is murder 

Murder sprung by a fling 
With ropes or a string 
Your hands only bring 
Death around a necks ring 

Execution by suffocation 
Condemned with abomination 
Deliberate foetus termination 

It is murder 

Make no mistake, 
Be careful 
Asleep or awake! 
Murder is unlawful 

If death occurs because of the effects of an evil curse 
I will say this with my lips pursed 
‘What a great loss, but this is not murder! 

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Murder, dreaded form of death 
One’s life taken in his better days 
Unfortunate thing happening 
His hopes and aspirations left ever. 

Murders, throughout the history 
For power, money, hegemony brutal murders 
Swords decided the fate of individuals 
Mighty, and learned ones got murdered. 

In great stories of William Shakespeare 
We read about brutal murders 
In the corridors of power, and struggles 
The individuals in high esteem 
Became the victims of murderers. 
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